Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 30th Global Experts Meeting on Neonatal Nursing and Maternal Healthcare Holiday Inn Atrium,Singapore.

Day 1 :

  • Neonatal Nursing | Maternal-Fetal Medicine | Neonatology | Perinatal Nursing | Neonatal Nutrition
Location: Sembawang Room, Level 3

Session Introduction

Dr . Wei Siang Yu

Founder and Chairman, Borderless Healthcare Group Inc

Title: A World’s First Model of Seamless Hospital2Home Maternal and Child Care
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Wei Siang Yu is a globally renowned pioneer in healthcare TMT (Technology, Media and Telecommunication). He is the Founder and Executive Chairman of Borderless Healthcare Group of companies which operates borderless healthcare initiatives around the world. Dr Wei graduated as one of the top students at Monash Medical School in 1995 and went against the conventional career path of an honours student to become a medical inventor in the space of digital bio-communication. Dr Wei gained worldwide recognition in his work on social application of digital bio-communication and became the youngest nominee of CNN People’s Choice Award in 2003. Dr Wei's work is also frequently featured by international media all around the world including Discovery Channel, CNN, BBC, Fox News, CNBC, ABC, Time, Wired, ZDF German TV, ARTE French TV, Japan TV, Yomiuri Shimbun, Korean SBS TV, Figaro, Asian Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Guardian UK, LA Times, Channel News Asia, Age, Sunday Times UK, Newsweek, Tatler, Bazaar, Marie Claire New York, Glamour Paris etc. As a global key opinion leader in healthcare TMT, disruptive healthcare solutions and healthcare business hybridisation process in Asia, Dr Wei is a regular speaker in major international conferences including the World Medical Tourism and Global Healthcare Congress, Slush, IATI BIOMED, BIOKOREA and mHealth Israel. He is also frequently invited by renowned institutions and organizations such as Stanford University, Oxford University, Singapore Management University, Renmin University, La Trobe University, the World Health Organization and United Nations to share his valuable insights on healthcare evolution and his vision on "consumerising" healthcare. Today, Dr Wei chairs the Borderless Healthcare Group of companies with the key role of converging global healthcare practices with technology, media and telecommunication applications via strategic partnerships, disruptive business models, and mergers & acquisitions.

Abstract:

Borderless Healthcare Group has developed a model of seamless care model from pregnancy planning to postnatal care using a "connected" hospital model where healthcare professionals in the hospital can interoperate with the caregiver, mother and child at home using smart tv, smart phone, home robots, sensors and other internet of things. The platform also allows the convergence of local and international experts "borderlessly". Multilingual case managers will manage every case of integrated care to ensure there is no language barrier during transmission. The ultimate aim of the platform is to generate maternal and child care big data where artificial intelligence can be applied. A new form of epidemiology of "always on" live data is expected to be derived from this platform which will herald a new era of predictive maternal and child care. A live demo of this platform will be shown during the presentation.

Speaker
Biography:

Luana Pesco Koplowitz is a Chief Medical and Scientific Officer, received her MD from Rutgers Medical School and her PhD from Rutgers College of Pharmacy and Columbia Pacific University. She has completed her training in Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Miami, School of Medicine. She is an Adjunct Professor of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine at the Medical Center of Delaware and is also Adjunct Faculty at the University of Miami, USA. She is a Fellow of the American College of Clinical Pharmacology and the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Medicine in UK. She is the President and Chief Medical and Scientific Officer of Duck Flats Pharma, LLC, USA. Previously, she was Chief Medical and Scientific Officer of Research Assist, Inc. She also held the position of Global Group Director of Clinical Pharmacology and US Nonclinical Development for the Janssen Research Foundation of Johnson & Johnson. She has been responsible for numerous successful INDs and NDAs during her 22-year career and holds several use patents in the treatment of various diseases. She has personal interests in the areas of overall drug development, PK/PD modeling and drug-drug interactions, receptor-binding modeling and special population clinical trials, especially pediatric, elderly and critical-care patients.

 

Abstract:

The Cardiac Safety Research Consortium (CSRC) is a transparent, public-private partnership that was established in 2005 as a Critical Path Program and formalized in 2006 under a Memorandum of Understanding between the United States Food and Drug Administration and Duke University. Our continuing goal is to advance paradigms for more efficient regulatory science related to the cardiovascular safety of new therapeutics, both in the United States and globally, particularly where such safety questions add burden to innovative research and development. This presentation is a summary of a White Paper that provided a summary of discussions by a cardiovascular committee cosponsored by the CSRC and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that initially met in December 2014 and periodically convened at FDA’s White Oak headquarters from March 2015 to September 2016. The committee focused on the lack of information concerning the cardiac effects of medications in the premature infant and neonate population compared with that of the older pediatric and adult populations. Key objectives of this presentation are as follows: Provide an overview of human developmental cardiac electrophysiology, as well as the electrophysiology of premature infants and neonates; summarize all published juvenile animal models relevant to drug-induced cardiac toxicity; provide a consolidated source for all reported drug-induced cardiac toxicities by therapeutic area as a resource for neonatologists; present drugs that have a known cardiac effect in an adult population, but no reported toxicity in the premature infant and neonate populations and summarize what is not currently known about drug-induced cardiac toxicity in premature infants and neonates and what could be done to address this lack of knowledge. This presentation presents the views of the authors and should not be construed to represent the views or policies of the FDA or Health Canada.

 

  • Keynote Forum
Location: Sembawang Room, Level 3

Session Introduction

Luana Pesco Koplowitz

Duck Flats Pharma LLC, USA

Title: Drug-induced cardiac abnormalities in premature infants and neonates

Time : 10:00 am-10:40 am

Speaker
Biography:

Luana Pesco Koplowitz, Chief Medical and Scientific Officer, received her MD from Rutgers Medical School and her PhD from Rutgers College of Pharmacy and Columbia Pacific University. She completed her training in Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Miami School of Medicine. She is adjunct Professor of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine at the Medical Center of Delaware and is also adjunct faculty at the University of Miami Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology. She is a fellow of the American College of Clinical Pharmacology and the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Medicine in the United Kingdom. Dr. Pesco Koplowitz is President & Chief Medical and Scientific Officer of DUCK FLATS Pharma, LLC, a biopharmaceutical consulting and contract company. Previously, she was Chief Medical & Scientific Officer of Research Assist, Inc. She also held the position of Global Group Director of Clinical Pharmacology and US Nonclinical Development for the Janssen Research Foundation of Johnson & Johnson. She has worked at Knoll Pharmaceuticals, Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Company, the Squibb Institute for Medical Research (now Bristol-Myers Squibb) and Key Pharmaceuticals. Dr. Pesco Koplowitz is a member of numerous medical and clinical pharmacology organizations and committees, most recently being asked to serve on the FDA/PhRMA QT Working Group Committee. Dr. Pesco Koplowitz has been responsible for numerous successful INDs and NDAs during her 22-year career and holds several use patents in the treatment of various diseases. She has worked in multiple therapeutic areas, and has personal interests in the areas of overall drug development, PK/PD modeling and drug-drug interactions, receptor-binding modeling and special population clinical trials, especially pediatric, elderly and critical-care patients. She is author or co-author on over 30 publications

Abstract:

The Cardiac Safety Research Consortium (CSRC) is a transparent, public-private partnership that was established in 2005 as a Critical Path Program and formalized in 2006 under a Memorandum of Understanding between the United States Food and Drug Administration and Duke University. Our continuing goal is to advance paradigms for more efficient regulatory science related to the cardiovascular safety of new therapeutics, both in the United States and globally, particularly where such safety questions add burden to innovative research and development. This presentation is a summary of a White Paper that provided a summary of discussions by a cardiovascular committee cosponsored by the CSRC and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that initially met in December 2014 and periodically convened at FDA’s White Oak headquarters from March 2015 to September 2016. The committee focused on the lack of information concerning the cardiac effects of medications in the premature infant and neonate population compared with that of the older pediatric and adult populations. Key objectives of this presentation are as follows: Provide an overview of human developmental cardiac electrophysiology, as well as the electrophysiology of premature infants and neonates; summarize all published juvenile animal models relevant to drug-induced cardiac toxicity; provide a consolidated source for all reported drug-induced cardiac toxicities by therapeutic area as a resource for neonatologists; present drugs that have a known cardiac effect in an adult population, but no reported toxicity in the premature infant and neonate populations and summarize what is not currently known about drug-induced cardiac toxicity in premature infants and neonates and what could be done to address this lack of knowledge. This presentation presents the views of the authors and should not be construed to represent the views or policies of the FDA or Health Canada

Dulanie Gunasekera

University of Sri Jayawardenepura, Sri Lanka

Title: Process of Quality Improvement (POQI) method-Improving quality of care in resource poor settings

Time : 10:40 am-11:20 am

Speaker
Biography:

Dulanie Gunasekera MBBS MD FRCP(Lon) FSLCP, is a consultant paediatrician and professor of Paediatrics. She is the current Chair and Academic Head of t department of Paediatrics, University of Sri Jayawardenepura, Sri Lanka. Her interests are in neonatology, breast feeding promotion, immunization and dengue infection and has authored over 40 publications in peer reviewed national and international journals. She is also a Master Trainer for the POQI method of quality improvement. Professor Gunasekera has been Past President of the Sri Lanka College of Pediatricians and the Perinatal Society of Sri Lanka, during which time she was instrumental in promoting basic newborn care in the peripheral regions of Sri Lanka.

Abstract:

In any health care setting, as health services improve, together with survival figures, emphasis should essentially shift to improving quality of care. Contrary to popular belief, quality improvement (QI) does not need excessive financial inputs, expensive infrastructure or outsourced expertise. The process of quality improvement (POQI) method shows how QI could be done at an institutional level utilizing the available resources and manpower. POQI is based on 4 simple rules, identifying the problem (making an AIM statement), finding the root cause of the problem (by using Fish Bone (root cause) analysis, 5-whys or Pareto charts), identifying the current processes and point of care issues which are causing/leading to the problem with possible interventions to overcome the problem (Process Flow chart) and devising a mechanism to overcome the problem; plan-do-study-act cycle (PDSA cycle). Two simple examples will be taken (e.g. preventing post-partum hemorrhage in the mother and preventing hypothermia in the newborn) to demonstrate how this methodology could be used to improving quality of care using locally available expertise and resources.

 

Speaker
Biography:

. Terese Verklan grew up in Canada and received her Bachelorette of Nursing in 1982 and her Bachelors of Arts (Sociology/Psychology) in 1984 from the University of Manitoba. She graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1987 with a Master’s in Nursing specializing in Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing. She then became of the Neonatal Clinical Nurse Specialists at the University of Tennessee’ Regional Medical Center in Memphis, which had the largest neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in the US at the time.  Dr. Verklan returned to the University of Pennsylvania and graduated with a PhD with a focus on the autonomic nervous system and neonatal physiologic variability. She then joined the University of Texas Houston Health Science Center as an Assistant Professor and was promoted to Associate Professor after two years. In addition to her teaching and clinical practice in the NICU, she was the primary investigator or co-investigator on a number of grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development that focused on neonatal physiologic variability in low- and high-risk neonates.  Currently Dr. Verklan is a Professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch in the Graduate School of Biologic Sciences and the School of Nursing. She is recognized as a clinical expert and educator in the care of high-risk neonates and consults worldwide. She is an Associate Editor for Nursing and Health Sciences and a Contributing Editor for Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing. Terese has received numerous awards for clinical practice., education and research, including Excellence in Education from the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses and is a 2010 Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. 

 

 

Abstract:

Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) has been used for decades in the medical treatment of ductal dependent critical congenital heart disease in neonates. We report a retrospective evaluation of the long-term effects of PGE1 in a neonatal intensive care unit in Saudi Arabia. There were 22 subjects with a wide spectrum of cardiac defects maintained on PGE1 for a mean of 38 days (range: 6-200 days). The majority of complications included hypokalemia, hypotension and apnea/bradycardia. Pseudo-Barett syndrome and gastric outlet obstruction were also found. While long-term administration of PGE1 in North America is rare, it is important to be aware of possible adverse effects of fluid and electrolyte imbalance, gastric outlet obstruction and feeding difficulties.

 

Cynthia Pang Pui Chan

KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore

Title: Pasteurized donor human milk for preterm infants

Time : 11:40-12:10

Speaker
Biography:

Cynthia Pang Pui Chan is a registered nurse, midwife with a Master Degree in Public Health and an International Board Certifi ed Lactation Consultant. As the Assistant Director of Nursing she oversees the Lactation Services and KK Human Milk Bank at KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital. She is a member of the Sales of Infant Food and Ethics Committee (Singapore), Country Coordinator for the International Board Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE) and Lead Associate in Education with the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore. She is also the Honorary Secretary of the Association for Breastfeeding Advocacy (Singapore) and member of the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) Committee, Singapore.She played a key role in the setting up of the KK Human Milk Bank and the development of the guidelines and workfl ows from donors to recipients.

Abstract:

Breast milk is the ideal nutrition for babies in the fi rst six months of life, as it contains enzymes to help with digestion, nutrients, growth factors, hormones and protective antibodies. Mothers of preterm babies can experience diffi culty in providing breast milk, especially in the initial days, due to a variety of reasons including complicated deliveries, or pre-existing medical conditions. Premature and sick babies are prone to feeding intolerance and are at risk of developing Necrotising Enterocolitis (NEC) and infections. Breast milk can be life-saving for these vulnerable preterm babies. Th e provision of safe,
pasteurized donor breast milk is aimed at reducing the risk of these conditions, while optimizing their immunity, development and overall health. KK Human Milk Bank is set up in accordance with the international guidelines and protocols by the United Kingdom National Institute of Health and Care (NICE) and Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA).
Th e Milk Bank only recruits mothers who are healthy and do not engage in high-risk behaviors. Donors are required to undergo a stringent donor screening process as well as education on the handling and storage of the breast milk prior to donation. Th e donor human milk is screened, processed and dispensed by prescription to preterm babies whose mothers are unable to provide sufficient breast milk.
 
Th ese babies must also meet the following criteria for eligibility:
born prematurely at less than 32 weeks of gestation,
weighing 1,800 grams or less at birth and
at a high risk of or diagnosed with NEC.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Maria Margaretha Ulemadja Wedho has completed her Masters and working as a Lecturer in the Department of Health, at Health Polytechnic, Indonesia.

Abstract:

Background: Th e Health development targets are to accelerate the decrease in Infant Mortality Rate (IMR) and Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR).
 
Aim: Th e purpose of this study was to explore women’s experiences of taking care of their infant/neonates (age 0-28 days) in two communities around Kupang, West Timor Desa Bipolo Kecamatan Sulamu and Kelurahan Sikumana Kota Kupang East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia.
 
Method: Qualitative research with case study approach was used to assess women’s experience in taking care of neonates. Five women with neonates were chosen as population and purposive sampling was conducted to select the respondents. Data were
collected by the way of structured interview with the mother. Moreover, there were three stages of data analysis consisting of data reduction, display data and conclusion drawing/verification.
 
Result: Th ree themes related to women’s experiences in taking care of neonates were identifi ed. Th ose are neonatal check-up or visitation, nutrition for fi ve post neonate women and the level of mother’s knowledge. Th e result of this study showed that
not only respondents have never been visited by health worker based on the government standard in NTT Province, but also they have never been educated on how to take care of and to feed their neonates well.
 
Conclusion: Further study should be conducted by health care worker or government in this case the Provincial and District Health Office to motivate the mother and family to compliance to government regulation standard to take care of neonatal. Health workers are expected to design the guidelines and counseling to decrease infant mortality rate in the community through education during the prenatal period. Heads of the village are expected to insist that the community especially pregnant women to visit health facilities at least 3 times during the neonatal period. Th e health workers are expected to visit families with neonates at least three times in the fi rst week of neonatal life.

Sino George

WHNP- Emory University Hospital Midtown, USA

Title: When the bough breaks: Preventing Infant falls

Time : 12:40-13:10

Speaker
Biography:

Sino George is a board-certifi ed Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner. She began her career in health care by working as Nurse Midwife. She has presented at local,national and international levels on quality improvements and research. Her research work has been published in a peer reviewed nursing journal.

Abstract:

Newborns experience in-hospital falls at rate of approximately 1.6/10,000 live births, resulting in 600-1600 falls per year in the United States before the last decade, the topic of in-hospital newborn fall/drop was virtually nonexistent in the literature.
Although in-hospital adult falls have long been a focus of research and intervention, there has been no tracking of data on the prevalence of falls among newborns and no published protocols specifi cally to prevent falls among newborns until recently.
Th e birth of a baby can be one of the most joyous experiences for families. Dropping a baby aft er falling asleep or caring for an infant when an accidental injury occurs can be an emotional and life-changing experience for families, especially if serious injury occurs. Literature now shows that healthcare facilities can make a diff erence in newborn events by incorporating prevention methods such as family awareness, staff monitoring and education for both staff and families. Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to identify inherent factors during hospitalization that increase the risk of a
newborn fall/drop and potential interventions to prevent newborn falls.

  • Workshop

Session Introduction

Irene Chain-Kalinowski, Meng Xue

Qingdao Huikang Nursing Training School, China

Title: The normal physiological process of birth and optimal positioning of baby
Speaker
Biography:

Irene Chain Kalinowski has practiced midwifery for 20 years on the continuity of care model. She has provided holistic care more than 1000 women from the
beginning of pregnancy, from the fi rst labor contraction through the entire labor and birth process. Meng Xue’s has experience of over 30 years with laboring women and brings her natural and traditional approaches to care.

Abstract:

Do you understand birth? Are you confi dent with supporting a woman through the most important day of her life? Do you encourage family support? A woman’s body talks to her and it talks to the midwife. Do you know how to be the observant caring midwife that doesn’t need to rely upon technology?
In this workshop you will learn:
• About normal birth. Is it Labor or not labor?
• How to support the normal physiological process of labor and birth.
• To be confi dent with the process.
• To understand the birthing hormones
• Develop observation and communication skills
• Support free movement and Position
• Positions women use in labor and birth
• Th e use of Doula Tools
• What to do if baby is in an awkward position

  • Networking and Refreshments Break: 16:00-16:20 @ Seletar Foyer

Session Introduction

Sandhya Ghai

National Institute of Nursing Education, India

Title: Case report of exclusively Breast-fed Neonate with Cow Milk Protein Allergy (CMPA)

Time : 16:20-16:50

Speaker
Biography:

Sandhya Ghai is working as a Principal at National Institute of Nursing Education, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.She has received Doctorate degree from Panjab University, Chandigarh. She published more than 100 papers in national and international journals. She was awarded with Best Educationist Award and is life member of many organizations.

Abstract:

Th e occurrence of Cow Milk Protein Allergy (CMPA) has been recognized in India. Overall the incidence of CMPA in the infants fed with formula milk is 5-7% and in breastfed infants it is 0.5-1%. Th ough the incidence is less in breastfed infants and early presentation is rare here in this case report we present a case of CMPA associated with exclusive breastfeeding. A three
months old female baby presented with complaints of streaks of blood in stool. The infant had one episode of blood streak in stool at two months of age. At three months of age baby was brought for neonatal consultation when episode of blood streak in stool increased to 4 times in a week. Th e baby was otherwise well. Stool examination revealed reddish yellow ill formed alkaline
reaction with traces of mucus and blood, pus cells 12-15, RBC 10-12/HPF, no cyst/ova and eosinophil count was 3 cells/cmm and occult blood positive. Colonoscopy revealed loss of vascular pattern and nodularity + throughout. Biopsy fi nding revealed intact colonic lining epithelium. Lamina propria shows focal congestion, moderate lymphoplasmacytic cells infi ltrate with
occasional eosinophils, bits of colonic mucosa with surface infl ammatory cell exudate. No signifi cant increase in eosinophils was noted. The mother reported an increased intake of milk and almonds in the days prior to the episode. As the episodes of blood streaks in stool increased, she was initially advised to stop almonds and eggs. But the symptoms did not subside and she was then advised total exclusion of CMP in her diet. Th e symptoms however, still persisted. Dietary evaluation revealed intake of CMP from sources having hidden content of milk e.g. bread. Mother was again counseled for CMP free diet and breast feed was continued. Th e episodes of blood streaks in baby’s stools settled. Gradually complementary feed was started at five months of age with semolina (suji) halva and mashed banana. In conclusion, we share our experience of managing a case of allergic proctocolitis due to CMPA in an exclusively breast fed neonate. It is important to remember hidden sources of CMP intake while modifying maternal diet.

Irene Chain-Kalinowski

Qingdao Huikang Nursing Training School, New Zealand

Title: Integrating homeopathy into maternity care

Time : 16:50-17:20

Speaker
Biography:

Sandhya Ghai is working as a Principal at National Institute of Nursing Education, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India. She has received Doctorate degree from Panjab University, Chandigarh. She published more than 100 papers in national and international journals. She was awarded with Best Educationist Award and is life member of many organizations.

Abstract:

Th e occurrence of Cow Milk Protein Allergy (CMPA) has been recognized in India. Overall the incidence of CMPA in the infants fed with formula milk is 5-7% and in breastfed infants it is 0.5-1%. Th ough the incidence is less in breastfed infants and early presentation is rare here in this case report we present a case of CMPA associated with exclusive breastfeeding. A three months old female baby presented with complaints of streaks of blood in stool. Th e infant had one episode of blood streak in stool at two months of age. At three months of age baby was brought for neonatal consultation when episode of blood streak in stool increased to 4 times in a week. Th e baby was otherwise well. Stool examination revealed reddish yellow ill formed alkaline reaction with traces of mucus and blood, pus cells 12-15, RBC 10-12/HPF, no cyst/ova and eosinophil count was 3 cells/cmm and occult blood positive. Colonoscopy revealed loss of vascular pattern and nodularity + throughout. Biopsy finding revealed intact colonic lining epithelium. Lamina propria shows focal congestion, moderate lymphoplasmacytic cells infiltrate with
occasional eosinophils, bits of colonic mucosa with surface infl ammatory cell exudate. No signifi cant increase in eosinophils was noted. Th e mother reported an increased intake of milk and almonds in the days prior to the episode. As the episodes of blood streaks in stool increased, she was initially advised to stop almonds and eggs. But the symptoms did not subside and she was then advised total exclusion of CMP in her diet. Th e symptoms however, still persisted. Dietary evaluation revealed intake of CMP from sources having hidden content of milk e.g. bread. Mother was again counseled for CMP free diet and breast feed was continued. Th e episodes of blood streaks in baby’s stools settled. Gradually complementary feed was started at five months of age with semolina (suji) halva and mashed banana. In conclusion, we share our experience of managing a case of allergic proctocolitis due to CMPA in an exclusively breast fed neonate. It is important to remember hidden sources of CMP intake while modifying maternal diet.